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Link Love Thursday: Let’s Go To Eataly!

Benvenuto a Eataly!Cute animals, Disney villains and pizza, oh my! This week, the Internet was filled with gold, and I’m excited to share with you in a one-day-late Link Love!

What great links have you come across this week?

Link Love Wednesday: Elephants, Barbies and ‘The Room’

Elephant-elephants-28788754-1024-768Now that everyone is winding down from their Valentine’s Day sugar highs, it is time for another round of link love! Below are some of the latest Internet highlights (according to me) – as always, feel free to add your own in the comments section!

What are some of the great links you’ve seen on the web today?

Link Love Wednesday: Millennials vs. Baby Boomers

iphone-5-apple-generations-sympathy-ecards-someecardsWhat do you get when you take a very full work calendar, a birthday and a series of federal and religious holidays? A blogger who forgets to post Link Love for a few weeks! :) Hopefully today’s round-up of posts about topics ranging from Generation Y to jet lag won’t disappoint.

Read anything interesting lately?

Link Love Wednesday: Goodbye, Google Reader!

google-reader-closedHappy Wednesday, friends! Today is June 19, which means we are less than two weeks away from the discontinuation of my favorite RSS reader, Google Reader. Ever since before I started blogging (my third WordPress anniversary was this week!), I have used Google Reader to track all of my favorite blogs, but on July 1, this feature will no longer be available. For all of my fellow nerds, July 1 will be a very sad day. This week’s links not only focus on our usual array of eclectic topics, but on how to cope with the end of Google Reader!

  • Are you following blogs on Google Reader? Check out BGR’s list of the best RSS readers to switch to before July 1. (I know I need to start moving feeds over, myself!)
  • Andrew from Shut Up Dad compiled a bachelor party checklist that everyone needs to consult, bachelor or otherwise. From fun hats to fanny packs, this bachelor will be one you won’t soon forget.
  • My best friend sent me this list of four life lessons that one blogger’s mother taught her, and it couldn’t have come at a better time. (Always pack your liquids in a Ziploc! I am a stickler for that one.)
  • This article poses the question, “How ready is America for gay-themed advertising?” A few of the bigger brands have released some LGBT-related ads that have set off a debate among consumers (read: bigots) on how visible the gay community should be in commercials. It is definitely an interesting article no matter where you stand on the subject, although I personally don’t understand what the big deal is!
  • Disney is cornering the market on Day of the Dead. This article discusses some of Disney’s more controversial choices, including its presence in the Mexican holiday and the transformation of the latest princess, Merida.
  • I’ll admit it – I’m just as guilty of taking selfies as the next 20-something girl! Of course, our love for snapping photos of ourselves has not gone unnoticed by marketers.
  • International Picnic Day just took place! Even if you missed it, Gala Darling poses some must-read advice for throwing the ideal picnic.
  • Here is a throwback to my indie music-loving early teen years! I just rediscovered this instrumental song by The Album Leaf and I can’t get enough. Enjoy!

What have you been reading lately?

Link Love Wednesday: From Glazed Donut Breakfasts to Tin Foil Hats

Rottenecards_10544754_ktxbvprgkfHave you missed me? :)

Link Love Wednesday took a brief hiatus over the past couple of weeks as I began adjusting to a full 40-hour work week, but fear not – this brand new feature is back! This set of links ranges from recent ad campaigns to articles on employability, and many topics in between.

  • For recent college grads and others looking for employment, check your social media to make sure it is employer-friendly. This article talks about what you need to look out for on your own Facebook page. (Just this morning I listened to a Chamber of Commerce member talk about how important this is, especially for young people!)
  • On a related note, Thought Catalog posted a list of things we have to stop sharing on Facebook. I think we’re all guilty of a few of these, but what are you most likely to overshare?
  • No wonder obesity is on the rise! Dunkin’ Donuts is about to launch a new glazed donut breakfast sandwich, and they’re claiming that it’s not even that bad for you! (I don’t know about you, but I can’t even imagine pairing a glazed donut with hash browns.)
  • Swiffer released an ad campaign featuring Rosie the Riveter, but because consumers are complaining that the ads are sexist, Swiffer is taking them down. Are consumers becoming too upset over nothing, or are these ads truly guilty of perpetuating women-in-the-kitchen stereotypes?
  • Tin foil hats may actually make it easier for the government to read your mind, according to Business Insider.
  • As someone who will be moving to a new apartment in a month, I found this quick article about apartment utilities especially helpful.
  • Mental Floss composed a list of 11 completely bizarre books that really exist. My favorite is Whose Bottom?, a children’s book that illustrates several animal butts, although I strongly believe that any child whose parent gives him or her that book may need Child Protective Services.
  • To lighten your day: this website helps you figure out what your baby with ____ will look like. Perfect way to come across as creepy on a first date!

What great articles and websites have you stumbled upon in the past couple of weeks?

Link Love Wednesday: And So It Begins!

cat-office-internet-comic-640Happy Wednesday, everyone! Today marks the first day of May, and in honor of the new month, I am rolling out a brand new feature on this blog: Link Love Wednesdays! It’s the middle of the week – couldn’t you use a little pick-me-up? Every Wednesday, I will post links to articles/lists/blogs/etc. that piqued my interest that week, and share them with each of you. Have you read anything great this week?

Enjoy the links!

The Weekend Five: Types of Political Advertisements

With the presidential election just two days away, many of us have long since decided which candidates we plan to vote for (or perhaps have already voted!) and are now just waiting to see what happens on Tuesday when the polls close. Nevertheless, the candidates still seek to sway the undecided voters and apathetic citizens by interrupting our favorite shows on Hulu with political advertisements coming from all different perspectives.

Having cast my absentee ballot several weeks ago, I look forward to the day that we can stop posting politically charged Facebook statuses and watching these ads. Whether I flip on my television or even turn the radio to the Spanish language station, I’m still flooded with “I’m ____ and I approve this message.” In honor of democracy, our upcoming election and my Bachelor’s degree in Advertising, I would like to present this weekend’s list of different types of political advertisements.

The Weekend Five: Types of Political Advertisements

1. “My opponent is awful.”
Instead of addressing what he or she plans to do for the country, the candidate instead takes jabs at his or her opponent, focusing on everything that this person either has done wrong or will do wrong if elected. These ads are completely negative in nature and tend to include a lot of graphs or out-of-context soundbites of the opponent saying something absolutely ridiculous and unforgivable.

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2. The Rebuttal.
Candidate B has seen Candidate A’s advertisement attacking what Candidate B said in that one speech, and now he’s mad. Candidate B counter-attacks with an equally bad soundbite of Candidate A that was likely also taken out of context. We haven’t learned much about what the candidates actually believe, but we do know that they really like pulling up old clips of their opponents.

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3. “My mom is my reference.”
When you’re applying for a job, and your prospective employer asks you for references, who do you turn to? If you’re at all serious about the job, you’ll want to carefully select past employers or people you’ve worked with who are familiar with what you have accomplished. In most cases, you would not choose your mother or your spouse to vouch for you. However, politicians don’t follow that logic, and instead will prominently feature their family members in some ads, who will then speak to the candidate’s personality or how great of a father he is. I don’t know about you, but when I’m looking to vote for a political candidate, I want to know about where he stands on the issues important to me — not how wonderful of a job his parents think he will do.

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4. The Trying-To-Be-Hip Ad.
Politicians are constantly trying to target the youth vote, either through commercials featuring young people worrying about the country’s future, or through commercials that take things a step further by using almost-hip lingo and insulting our intelligence in the process. As a 22-year-old, I was actually a little offended by a Mitt Romney commercial that compared him and President Obama on how “cool” they were. The commercial concluded with the idea that even though Romney wasn’t as “cool” as Obama, he was still the right man for the job. Although there is nothing wrong with the message of the ad, I was annoyed that advertisers actually thought that young voters would select a candidate so superficially. I have voted in two presidential elections thus far, and in neither did I select a candidate because of his apparent coolness (nor have any of my friends or acquaintances, for that matter). Rather, I voted for the candidate whose vision of America reflected my own, the candidate that I believed would be best for our country. These ads condescend to their audience of 18-25 -year-olds because they assume we’re still thirteen and care about voting for what’s” cool.”

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5. The Fight for the Marginalized Groups.
Both parties will pose advertisements that are directed to marginalized groups (whatever the focus may be for the particular election), assuring them that their lives will be better under a particular candidate’s reign. This year, women are the target audience of many ads, which admittedly has proven interesting as each side fights for their support, discussing what they plan to do to preserve women’s rights. The middle class is another important demographic, as each party argues reasons why the middle class will disappear if the other candidate is elected. (I would love to hear what the Republican candidates have to say to their gay constituents, but that’s another story!)

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What types of political advertisements are you sick of seeing?

Let’s not get too partisan in the comments section — this blog was written for fun and not to create too much of an argument! :) I’m always fascinated by the types of ads that politicians put together, and would love to know more about some of the memorable ones you’ve seen this year.

The Friday Five: Signs That You’re A Communications Major

As someone who identifies so closely with her major, I can often pick up on some of the differences between myself and my business/pre-med/engineering friends. For those of you who didn’t know, I’m currently a junior majoring in Advertising and Public Relations, which is part of my university’s Communications school. Through my experiences in its academic organizations, classes and internships (along with my interactions with other Communications majors!), I have noticed key similarities among our little group.

If you are majoring in Advertising, Public Relations, Journalism or any other form of Communications — or if you have a close friend in one of these majors or professions — follow along and see which of the following signs are applicable!

The Friday Five: Signs That You’re A Communications Major

1. You find yourself mentally correcting people when they say things that don’t comply with AP Style.

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2. You live-tweet about the commercials during the Super Bowl instead of actually watching the game.

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3. “Diversifying your portfolio” has nothing to do with personal finances, and everything to do with clipping unique samples of your work to show potential employers.

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4. You study the menus at your favorite chain restaurants — not because you’re interested in the food, but because you want to see how those restaurants implement their brand standards throughout their food and beverage menus.

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5. Because you are relatively active on Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter, you consider yourself the ultimate social media guru.

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Readers, what are some signs indicative of your major?